Project

Our longest running client, leading industrial drive manufacturer Control Techniques, had a website experience that was running severely behind the revitalised brand. An outdated back end and a site map that had bloated over time meant the user’s needs were often getting lost. They turned to us to create a completely new site that was built around solving customer pain points quickly and engagingly.

Insight

Assume unfamiliarity

Control Techniques’ product range is extensive but needs a degree of expertise to navigate. We shaped the new site around a different type of customer: everyday business owners, new to the world of drives and machine automation. We built the UX around user journeys that solved three typical problems, flipping the approach from product-first to customer-first.

Website

User experience design

Website design

Illustration

Animation

Copywriting
Production

driveobsessed.com

Driving better user experiences

Creating an immersive website from the ground up

The streamlined site experience was designed to work as seamlessly on mobile as on desktop, with further sections on company history, case studies and a branch finder.

To help users understand the products, each core range had one immersive homepage with 3D product images that rotated on scroll, along with a newly commissioned product video, reducing complexity.

They say

“Tremendous work and vision… transformative from start to finish. We absolutely love it!”

Pam Chahal, Head of Global Marketing, Control Techniques

Customers don’t always know which product is right for them, but they always know their own needs. To direct users, we built a product filter that asked two simple questions – what industry they were in, and what they needed their machine to do – and delivered one product result.

To educate users on everything drive-related, we built The Library – an archive of articles on everything from the science behind automation to the future of the workplace.

Design

The five-section homepage links products to industries with a series of animations, by our friends at Patswerk, that combine buildings, machinery and drives in cityscapes that play with scale.